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One Reason to Write

This post sparked mine today.

I've been writing (slowly, one anecdote at a time) my memories of my youth, and the stories that I remember being passed down from parents, grandparents, and other long-lived people.

I was fortunate - in my mother's family, old age was the default - my grandparents were born in the 19th century, and passed on stories of their youth. My father's family was equally long-lived, but not as talkative (WV vs. Irish-descent). Still, I have an aunt by marriage whose passion is genealogy, and who had compiled a bookshelf of clippings, copies of newspaper stories, and charts of the family, back to pre-Colonial times.

If you aren't on (and, I don't blame you - the price has risen shockingly!), you might want to use a word processing program or app - Google Docs is easy to use, and can be shared with others easily - to write down your memories - personal, or what has been told to you.

If you'd rather, set up a videocam, and record that process orally. Links to some ideas about what to write down/talk about below.


  1. An excellent source to organize and compile family ancestry is a nifty free genealogy software program called GRAMPS. Is available for both Windows platforms and Linux. I have used it for years.

  2. Thanks for the suggestion, particularly one that can be used on Linux. I've used Windows at work, I have a MacBook (I probably wouldn't buy another, because of the expense, but it was convenient when traveling, as it was very easy to hook into any network or Bluetooth setup).

    I'm looking to get into Linux in retirement (SOON, please God!), and will be getting a Raspberry Pi kit next month. It's probably my first retirement project.


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