Skip to main content

One Reason to Write

This post sparked mine today.

I've been writing (slowly, one anecdote at a time) my memories of my youth, and the stories that I remember being passed down from parents, grandparents, and other long-lived people.

I was fortunate - in my mother's family, old age was the default - my grandparents were born in the 19th century, and passed on stories of their youth. My father's family was equally long-lived, but not as talkative (WV vs. Irish-descent). Still, I have an aunt by marriage whose passion is genealogy, and who had compiled a bookshelf of clippings, copies of newspaper stories, and charts of the family, back to pre-Colonial times.

If you aren't on Ancestry.com (and, I don't blame you - the price has risen shockingly!), you might want to use a word processing program or app - Google Docs is easy to use, and can be shared with others easily - to write down your memories - personal, or what has been told to you.

If you'd rather, set up a videocam, and record that process orally. Links to some ideas about what to write down/talk about below.

Comments

  1. An excellent source to organize and compile family ancestry is a nifty free genealogy software program called GRAMPS. Is available for both Windows platforms and Linux. I have used it for years.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Thanks for the suggestion, particularly one that can be used on Linux. I've used Windows at work, I have a MacBook (I probably wouldn't buy another, because of the expense, but it was convenient when traveling, as it was very easy to hook into any network or Bluetooth setup).

    I'm looking to get into Linux in retirement (SOON, please God!), and will be getting a Raspberry Pi kit next month. It's probably my first retirement project.

    ReplyDelete

Post a Comment

Popular posts from this blog

Bouncing Back From Setbacks

I was reading (nothing much, just noodling around), and found this link to Bouncing Back After Setbacks, and the resilience needed to do so.

Resilience is the (according to Dictionary.com):
abilitytorecoverreadilyfromillness,depression,adversity,orthe like;buoyancy One factor that is not fully appreciated by many parents is the importance of experiencing Failure - AND recovering from it.

Some lessons from a school that has studied the successes - and failures.

I'm going to start a regular post on At Last - Retiring for Good, that focuses on Things Kids Need to Learn From Grandma. If you'd like to be added to the list, go here and put your information into the link form.

Getting Back on Track

I started off strong - really, I did. When I first retired, I had the strength of 10. But, as the summer passed, I lost my Mojo.

The first thing to go was my dedication to daily upkeep of the house. I found myself weakly saying, maƱana.


Then, I began raiding the fridge. I packed on a lot of the weight I had lost in the last semester I worked.


Lastly, I began skipping my revision schedule. I read aimlessly, both on- and offline.

I started taking naps. Like a 3-year old.

So, unless I want to become this:


I need to re-boot my life plans.

I started Tuesday morning by getting cleaned up and dressed. I got to work with revising my Chem book, planning my week, and cleaning up the kitchen.

Together, Den and I planned a healthy breakfast, conferred about our schedules, and made the bed (that last is not easy to get done early, if you have a partner - like mine - who likes to sleep in).

I didn't manage to check-in with the Ham Radio NET today, but I did re-set my radio for the local repeaters (I ha…