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What Do You Want to DO in Retirement?

Den and I were kicking around this very topic last night:

What do you want your retirement to look like?
Ways to get things done

I'm changing life-long habits

My husband indicated that he wants to see changes in how we do things at home. He wants me to schedule weekly chores, and become more organized (OK, he's right that I could definitely benefit from this).

I set up an erasable calendar, with just a few things scheduled. Later, once I get those things a part of a routine, I can add more stuff.

I have two calendars:

  • Monthly - it's erasable, and has been a great help in getting my commitments in front of my husband (I've try using online calendars, but he doesn't look at them). It's also helped me in daily/weekly planning.
  • A workweek-only one under the monthly one, with room for daily tasks/reminders.
So far, this system has been working for me.


Catholicism

My husband picked up a couple of the Matthew Kelly books at church. The organization Dynamic Catholic provides very low-cost books to churches, so they can put them in the hands of those attending. The first book, Rediscovering Catholicism, was designed to be given out at Easter and Christmas masses (Kelly had found that many sort-of Catholics only attended those masses, and thought it would be a good way to reach them).

If you go to their website, you can either order the individual books for the cost of the shipping - WELL worth the price - or your parish can sign up for their book program. I talked to my Director of Religious Education at my church, and we decided to order the books for our adult group 2 years ago. We read 4 Signs of a Dynamic Catholic, which I HIGHLY recommend. It formed the springboard to about 6 weeks of lively discussion in our group.

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