Skip to main content

Medicare Fraud Crack-Down

Notice, however, this is hitting the people behind the schemes, not the possibly tricked elderly.

Fraud taking money from government programs is a HUGE (YUGE?) thing. They range from doctors billing for non-existent treatment, to over-prescribing drugs for participants, to luring patients in with the promise of FREE stuff (mobility devices for ALL!).

It's not free - it is spending money that taxpayers don't have, to enrich people with no conscience.
With government programs, if you don't pay for something, it's not the same as getting it for FREE!

Someone - perhaps younger or future taxpayers - is paying for it. Free stuff comes at a cost - that money won't be available for other needs - defense of our borders, care for veterans, paying back the money that is already owed (here is a link to the National Debt Clock - the upper left hand corner shows the overall tally - other parts put that figure in context). That's all money SOMEONE has to pay for - and there are not that many rich people who can be forced to pay for it.

Payback will fall to those of us who work and pay taxes. That's about 53% of the population. A little more than 1/2 of Americans are responsible for paying for all of these 'give-aways'.

What can we do about this massive debt?
  • Put a halt to increases in programs. Sort out those who should not be getting money, or who are being overpaid (including government contractors).
  • Put all departments/agencies on an austerity budget - 5% less in their budget this year. They will have to chose which activities are core, and which are fluff.
  • Offer bounties to those who report fraud or abuses of government programs - if their evidence or information leads to a conviction/settlement, they get a cut.
  • If someone takes money they are not entitled to, it comes out of their:
    • Paycheck
    • Income tax refund/credit
    • Social Security check, if they haven't paid it off before they collect one
    • Other sources of income, including Federal/State/Local pension
  • Cut the waste. Stop those end-of-the-year purchases. If the agency/department doesn't spend everything, they return the money. NO bonuses if they spend to the limit. NO raises/promotions until the department's budget is at least 5% less than was budgeted.


Popular posts from this blog

Beware Those 'Helping' You

I've never belonged to AARP. My husband joined, just for the discounts (probably MOST peoples' motivation).

I've heard about the immense profit AARP makes selling companies access to seniors (you do know that they are a large driver of all that junk mail you receive, don't you?). This gives more evidence for the charge that they are not so much a lobbying group, as a predator.
...most of AARP’s revenues do not come from the “members” it purports to represent. The group’s primary source of income is from royalties it receives from its AARP branded health insurance plans, which enjoy exemptions from some of Obamacare’s more onerous taxes and fees.

Budgeting for Retirement

My Father's decision to retire early

My father had received a diagnosis of pancreatic cancer from his doctor, when he was 60. He was naturally quite flummoxed, and wondered what to do.
He returned to work after the news, and made a list of his expenses, his current income, and his income as it would be if he retired. He also noted which expenses would drop if he did retire early, such as commuting expenses, lunches out, and clothing purchases/dry cleaning.
He found that he would LOSE money if he continued working.
He turned in his forms that day.
Was it a good choice? Well, he lived another 16 years, and was able to pursue his hobbies, spend time with his family, and enjoy the freedom of not having to answer to others.
I'm not that lucky. I've generally earned more in the last 10 years, and will stand to lose some income as a result of my decision to retire. That's even after factoring in reduced expenses.
For me, it's worth it, for the freedom it gives me to pursu…