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Moving Forward with the Paperwork

It's a slow process - a VERY slow process.
  • The NC check came yesterday - MONTHS after I sent in the paperwork. However, it did come, and is currently in the hands of the SC Retirement people. I made a physical trip down there this morning, to make sure that the money would be in their hands today.
  • It looks I've started getting the SC retirement money - my bank is showing the first check (e-deposit) is pending. Don't know how the NC money will affect that. It may mean I have to refund the June money, and take the first month as of July. We'll see.
  • I'm getting the piddling SS money ($8/month). However, I won't be taking my SS as a worker until at least January of 2018. Maybe longer, it depends on how long Den is working, and if I can scrounge extra money up - either teaching a college class, or writing for magazines, or something.
  • I'm still waiting on the new Medicare card. The old one only shows Part A. However, on the web, it does show that Part B is there, as well as all of the rest of the alphabet that I have to have.
  • Have not been able to look over the taxes yet, since I left school. I've put it on my list, but other situations took precedence (including a bad back). Hopefully, over the next 2 weeks, I'll manage to get that taken care of.


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